1. even more info on SUNSWICK CREEK: Reflecting Forward →

  2. sunset on Sunion Point at Socrates

  3. Luna de miel in the rock sanctuary for love in forbidden territory needle and towers in view beyond the cove through mossy timbers of an abandoned barge at low tide docked waiting recycling to allow the old sluice opening to turn the stone that grinds the wheat waving in the west wind close by the studio and QB.

    A work that reveals the state of the shoreline that we have focused our vision on to access for people to get to the water for peace.  

    -George Trakas

  4. images of Mary Miss’s installation SUNSWICK CREEK: Reflecting Forward

  5. Mary Miss’s SUNSWICK CREEK: Reflecting Forward follows a forgotten waterbody from Socrates’ shoreline to 16 Oaks Park

  6. Below our feet in Ravenswood a creek is buried.  Once a natural system it now flows through a series of pipes that catch the street runoff through storm drains after a rain.  Can the historic ecology help give insight into future development scenarios in the area?  Or suggest how a natural ecology can be bolstered if integrated into development?
 
A corridor of embedded mirrors, banded poles and speech bubbles provides cues for tracing the path of Sunswick Creek.  By ‘tagging’ this stream’s former location from its origins at 16 Oaks Park to the mouth at Socrates Sculpture Park a glimpse of the original character of this place is given while providing an insight into how the natural system has continued to shape this part of New York City.  
 
Following the markers that can be glimpsed one to the next, a visitor finds intermittent stations with a number to be dialed  to hear a description of the area as a place of constant regeneration.  There is also the opportunity to respond to queries about the area and add the visitors’ own insights.
  
Waterways are systems of maintenance and renewal.  Over time we imagine this corridor becoming more physically apparent:  wheeled planter carts suggest moving markers and plants out to signify the former the original corridor; the insights of residents and visitors will accumulate to reveal the continued richness and potential of the stream’s path.
-Mary Miss

    Below our feet in Ravenswood a creek is buried.  Once a natural system it now flows through a series of pipes that catch the street runoff through storm drains after a rain.  Can the historic ecology help give insight into future development scenarios in the area?  Or suggest how a natural ecology can be bolstered if integrated into development?

     

    A corridor of embedded mirrors, banded poles and speech bubbles provides cues for tracing the path of Sunswick Creek.  By ‘tagging’ this stream’s former location from its origins at 16 Oaks Park to the mouth at Socrates Sculpture Park a glimpse of the original character of this place is given while providing an insight into how the natural system has continued to shape this part of New York City.  

     

    Following the markers that can be glimpsed one to the next, a visitor finds intermittent stations with a number to be dialed  to hear a description of the area as a place of constant regeneration.  There is also the opportunity to respond to queries about the area and add the visitors’ own insights.

      

    Waterways are systems of maintenance and renewal.  Over time we imagine this corridor becoming more physically apparent:  wheeled planter carts suggest moving markers and plants out to signify the former the original corridor; the insights of residents and visitors will accumulate to reveal the continued richness and potential of the stream’s path.

    -Mary Miss

  7. if you can’t beat ‘em, repurpose ‘em!

    Mary Miss’ SUNSWICK CREEK: Reflecting Forward, repurposes the iconic red and white stripes from Transcanada company’s behemoth power plant (aka Big Allis). 

  8. The rain has been good for the grasses in Mary Miss’ installation at Socrates titled SUNSWICK CREEK: Reflecting Forward

  9. the ducks don’t mind the weather either….

    the ducks don’t mind the weather either….

  10. Experimenting with Encendia’s Urban Blend biochar

    Experimenting with Encendia’s Urban Blend biochar